gems of september and october

spent a lot of the month watching Twin Peaks, the rest watching makino. then i got back into melee.

Harakiri (Kobayashi, 1962) – was in a bit of a movie slump prior to seeing this and i’d been saving this movie for a day like that. i knew i would at least find it solid but it sorta exceeded expectations and became a favorite of mine. my first kobayashi and i want to definitely check out his other classics at the least, and maybe dabble in his deep cuts as well.

virtually everything i saw at the Show and Tell exhibit for takashi makino would rank as either a highlight or a bonafide masterpiece, but i’ll give a special shoutout to At the Horizon which, upon my first watch, seems like it could be the greatest non-narrative film i’ve ever seen. words really can’t do it (or other makino films) justice; it really needs to be experienced to be believed.

Homework (Kiarostami, 1989) – this endures as one of kiarostami’s more direct and “simple” films, which is hardly a mark against it. its examination of how generational norms can be transposed to the younger ones (albeit in a specific framework that never feels anything other than universal) is well-crafted and builds to a classic kiarostami finale, ripe with his ever-present humanism.

Finished (Jones, 1997): a great find by remi. labyrinth tale about a man fixated on someone who struck him, a kind of obsession i think most people can occasionally relate to. one of the only films that has a similar vibe to Los Angeles Plays Itself in how it’s constructed as an essay film of sorts. definitely a huge film even when it admits its own shortcomings outright.

Twin Peaks as a whole: well, i finally bit the bullet and finished S2 (which wasn’t very good), excitedly devoured Fire Walk With Me (which was great) and then plunged into The Return (which, will maybe a bit overhyped, is some fantastic movie-making). lynch is a master of these intricate, guilt-ridden tales, and the best parts of this series are when he meshes this with his knack for striking imagery. i’m down for more of it now that i’ve actually gotten through the S2 slump.

Super Inframan (Shan, 1975): unbridled fun. like seriously, you are not ready for how fun this movie is. sets, oversatured cinematography, action editing, costumes (especially the costumes), SFX, stunt choreography, everything is designed for maximum campy excellence. can’t believe i don’t hear more about this.

Cleopatra (Bressane, 2007): i haven’t seen anything by bressane and have really no idea what his other movies are like, which makes analyzing what is already a pretty difficult film to analyze even more difficult. i can say at least that i get heavy straub-huillet vibes, manoel de oliveira in baroque mode, and India Song. i really don’t have enough to say about this in terms of analysis, but really like the sets, the purple prose, and the ardent sexuality of it.

Dusty Stacks of Mom: The Poster Project (Mack, 2013): i’d known about this and its acclaim for a while but never actually had an idea of what it would be like. as it turns out, it’s Crashbox for art thots. yeah.

The Amazonian Angel (Klonaris & Thomadaki, 1992): i think the closest reference point i have to this would have to be Salome by hernandez. like that film, i’m drawn to how impressive and dreamlike its imagery is, although in this there’s a bunch of dialogue that very dissociative and reminds me of abstract poetry. it’s a combination that clashes occasionally but the end product is one that works well for me, and i would love to see more of these directors’ work.

Every Single Night (Tsao, 2019): it confirms not only tsao’s consistency but also his range; where Utah was a well-shot, well-edited direct cinema sort of documentary, the artificiality of Every Single Night‘s construction and the setups of its concept scream an entirely different idea altogether. always attempts to re-invent itself in unique ways, homerun with this one. look forward to producing what the director manages next.

Lake Mungo (Anderson, 2008): i somehow entirely had mis-categorized this film in my head. i thought it was supposed to be some slower slasher film, when in reality it’s a mockumentary that feels like reverse kiyoshi kurosawa; something which starts creepy, seems to suggest that the world is creepy enough as we know it, and then pivots into unusual lynchian directions. some of the most effective horror of the last two decades and an easy favorite for me.

Bliss (Begos, 2019): out of the 6 horror movies i saw at the horror marathon, this was the only one that really knocked it out of the park for me. takes some obvious cues from ferrara structurally and from a laundry list of films stylistically but begos has the control of a seasoned director in how he synthesizes these many styles and ideas. a great gem to find, one i probably never would have seen if not for the screening.

Milla (Massadian, 2017): an indie film which is so careful about sidestepping negative indie conventions that it ends up becoming somewhat toothless by the end of it, though it’s still an engaging watch with some beautiful moments to it. reminds me of costa more than anything, who i like but have rarely seen as a personal favorite (seems to be the case with this film too). would love to check out some more of massadian’s work though.

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